Tag: Confirmation Bias

Making Pro-Pro Charts To Overcome Biases

Are you a Microsoft or Apple fan? For over 30 years 2 tech giants have used very different marketing strategies, with avid fans on both sides of the argument. With strong biases, many are either avid Apple or Microsoft fans with no in-between. But if you were looking to these as models to decide your

Continue reading

Is That Your Final Answer? Controlling Emotion at the Moment of Decision

“Is that your final answer?” That famous phrase heard worldwide in different languages on the wildly popular game show “Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?” meant that the time had come to make a final decision. Viewers sweated and felt the knotted stomach of emotional tension in the contestant. In my previous articles on decision-making,

Continue reading
No comments

Seeing Red: 7 Ways to Overcome Your Confirmation Bias

Imagine driving down the highway, and suddenly a red flash cuts you off and zooms recklessly ahead, quickly disappearing in the distance. You think to yourself, “What a jerk! Thinks he doesn’t have to obey rules…he’s going to kill somebody! It figures he’s in a red Porsche…” And from that point you draw a conclusion

Continue reading

Making Better Decisions: 5 Practical Methods to Create More Choices

Our own brains can battle against effective decision-making because of cognitive biases. Limited models in our minds and unconscious efforts to take the easy and obvious road skew our view of the world of possibilities we should consider in a decision. But these 5 methods help us open up our options for better solutions.

No comments

18 Ways to Make a Bad Decision

We like to think we make reasonable, rational decisions…but there are many more pitfalls than we realize leading to irrationality. The first step in avoiding those traps is being aware of them. Come take a look at our complex mind, and how we often deceive ourselves.

One comment

Lessons From NASA Disasters: When Curiosity Deficits Kill

Curiosity comes naturally to children…but adults think they already know everything, and lose the soft power skill of being incessantly inquisitive. It may kill cats, but curiosity is essential for a highly innovative and reliable organization—a HIRO—to function well. Two heart-breaking disasters in NASA’s history demonstrate how important it is to constantly stay curious.

No comments